Title

Patients recently treated for B-lymphoid malignancies show increased risk of severe COVID-19: A CCC19 registry analysis

Authors

Samuel M. Rubinstein, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
Divaya Bhutani, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, United States.
Ryan C. Lynch, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.
Chih-Yuan Hsu, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States.
Yu Shyr, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville,, TN, United States.
Shailesh Advani, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington DC, MD, United States.
Ruben A. Mesa, Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, United States.
Sanjay Mishra, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States.
Daniel P. Mundt, Advocate Aurora HealthFollow
Dimpy P. Shah, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, United States.
R Alejandro Sica, Montefiore/Einstein Cancer Center, Bronx, NY, United States.
Keith E. Stockerl-Goldstein, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States.
Catherine Stratton, Yale University, New Haven, United States.
Matthias Weiss, Advocate Aurora Health
Alicia Beeghly-Fadiel, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States.
Melissa Accordino, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States.
Sarit E. Assouline, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Joy Awosika, University of Cincinnati Cancer Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
Ziad Bakouny, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
Babar Bashir, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
Stephanie Berg, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, United States.
Mehmet Asim Bilen, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory Univesity, Atlanta, GA, United States.
Cecilia A. Castellano, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
Jacob C. Cogan, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States.
Devendra Kc, Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute, Hartford, CT, United States.
Christopher R. Friese, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, United States.
Shilpa Gupta, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, United States.
Daniel Hausrath, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States.
Clara Hwang, Henry Ford Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, United States.
Nathalie A. Johnson, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
et al

Abstract

Patients with B-lymphoid malignancies have been consistently identified as a population at high risk of severe COVID-19. Whether this is exclusively due to cancer-related deficits in humoral and cellular immunity, or whether risk of severe COVID-19 is increased by anti-cancer therapy, is uncertain. Using data derived from the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19), we show that patients treated for B-lymphoid malignancies have an increased risk of severe COVID-19 compared to control populations of patients with non-B-lymphoid hematologic malignancies. Among patients with B-lymphoid malignancies, those who received anti-cancer therapy within 12 months of COVID-19 diagnosis experienced increased COVID-19 severity compared to patients with B-lymphoid malignancies off therapy, after adjustment for cancer status and several other prognostic factors. Our findings suggest that patients recently treated for a B-lymphoid malignancy are at uniquely high risk for severe COVID-19.

Type

Article

PubMed ID

35262738


 

Share

COinS